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      In photos: Pride celebrations around the world after Orlando

      In photos: Pride celebrations around the world after Orlando In photos: Pride celebrations around the world after Orlando In photos: Pride celebrations around the world after Orlando
      Christian Escobar Mora/EPA

      Americas

      In photos: Pride celebrations around the world after Orlando

      By Ruby Samuels

      People around the globe marched in parades for Pride Day on Sunday, an annual celebration that was shaped this year by the recent mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that claimed 49 lives.

      Parades all over the US featured signs of solidarity for the victims of the massacre, with many demonstrators carrying banners that read, "We stand with Orlando." In the Chicago parade, the first 49 marchers each held a photograph of one of the victims.

      With memories of the shooting still fresh, there was an increased police presence at most parades. Along the parade route in New York, cops were posted on rooftops, in helicopters, and alongside bomb-sniffing dogs.

      Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton marched in Manhattan on Sunday amid rainbow flags and an escort of armed personnel. Clinton's attendance at the march was mostly limited to an appearance in front of the Stonewall Inn, where she stood alongside New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and Reverend Al Sharpton. Just one day earlier, President Barack Obama named the Stonewall — a landmark the gay rights movement after a police raid there in 1969 sparked riots — the first American national monument to LGBT rights.

      Related: After Orlando: Stonewall reacts

      After Pride Day in New York, Clinton, using a rainbow-tinted Twitter handle, wrote, "One year ago, love triumphed in our highest court. Yet LGBT Americans still face too many barriers. Let's keep marching until they don't."

      In London, the Red Arrows of the Royal Air Force aerobatic team flew over the pride parade at the same time as a rainbow flag flew in front of Parliament. Additionally, at least two London police officers proposed to their same-sex partners during the parade and were publicly engaged.

      Meanwhile, political censorship stifled the pride celebration in Turkey. Authorities attempted to ban this year's parade in Istanbul, and police arrested at least 19 people and launched tear gas at the crowd that gathered to demonstrate.

      NYPD Police Chief James P. O'Neill talks to officers as they march in the 46th annual New York City Gay Pride Parade in New York, New York. (Photo by Porter Binks/EPA)

      A participant waives a rainbow flag during the annual Gay Pride Parade in Cali, Colombia. (Photo by Christian Escolar Mora)

      People march in the 46th annual New York City Gay Pride Parade on June 26, 2016. (Photo by Alba Vigaray/EPA)

      People laying in the ground as part of the protest for gun control and the Orlando victims during New York City's annual Gay Pride Parade. (Alba Vagary/EPA)

      Two men in colorful hats attend the 26th LGTB Pride March of San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Photo by Thais Llorc/EPA)

      US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets people as she marches in the New York City Gay Pride Parade. (Photo by Peter Foley/EPA)

      Participants walk the streets during the 26th LGTB Pride March of San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Thais Llorca/EPA)

      A couple kisses during the annual Gay Pride Parade in Cali, Colombia, 26 June 2016. (Christian Escobar Mora/EPA)

      People march in the 46th annual New York City Gay Pride Parade. (Photo by Alba Vagary/EPA)

      Two participants kiss where the preparation for the parade is taking place as part of the LGBT festival 'Pride in London', in London, Britain, 25 June 2016. (Photo by Hayoung Jeon/EPA)

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      Topics: americas, gay pride, lgbt, politics, new york city, stonewall inn, puerto rico, istanbul, turkey, london, pride day, orlando

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