Just three and half years after the popular revolution which overthrew longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians returned to the polls in May to participate in their second presidential election in 23 months. Former President Mohamed Morsi was deposed by army chief Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in July 2013. The months following Morsi's ouster have been marked by violence, regular anti-regime demonstrations, a crackdown on opposition groups, and insurgency against the country's security forces. All the while, Sisi's popularity grew immensely as he prepared to stand in this election. His lone competitor was Hamdeen Sabahi, who finished third to Morsi in 2012.

VICE News reporter Seif Khirfan spoke to supporters of both candidates and those boycotting the election, discussed military rule, and attended a Sabahi campaign event. He then visited Cairo's Tahrir Square on results night, focal point of the revolution that removed Mubarak in 2011 and anti-Morsi protests in 2013.

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